Judaea and the Greco-Roman world in the time of Herod in the light of archaeological evidence

acts of a symposium

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht in Göttingen

Written in English
Published: Pages: 251 Downloads: 272
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Places:

  • Palestine

Subjects:

  • Art, Ancient -- Palestine -- Congresses.,
  • Excavations (Archaeology) -- Palestine -- Congresses.,
  • Palestine -- Antiquities -- Congresses.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

Statementorganized by the Institute of Archaeology, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Archaeological Institute, Georg-August-University of Göttingen at Jerusalem, November 3rd-4th 1988 ; edited by Klaus Fittschen and Gideon Foerster.
GenreCongresses.
SeriesAbhandlungen der Akademie der Wissenschaften in Göttingen, Philologisch-historische Klasse ;, 3. Folge, Nr. 215
ContributionsFittschen, Klaus., Foerster, G., Universiṭah ha-ʻIvrit bi-Yerushalayim. Makhon le-arkheʼologyah., Universität Göttingen. Archäologisches Institut.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsN5460 .J84 1996
The Physical Object
Pagination251 p. :
Number of Pages251
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL290176M
ISBN 103525823592
LC Control Number97194495
OCLC/WorldCa36060829

This is an accessible and up-to-date account of the Jews during the millennium following Alexander the Great's conquest of the East. Unusually, it acknowledges the problems involved in constructing a narrative from fragmentary yet complex evidence and is, Cited by: 4. Herod went to Rhodes to meet the victorious Octavian, and through his political skill, and likely proven ability to stabilize the province, continued in his confirmation as ruler of Judaea. Herod was a brutal king, but this brutality helped keep an often instable political and religious environment on peaceful terms. that existed in Judaea and Galilee as in all of the Roman world. The evolution of land tenure has sometimes been envisioned in modern literature as a contin-uous, one-way transformation of freeholders into tenants and landless laborers, as a consequence of the constitution of latifundia-style properties. This is only part of the Size: KB. Herod the Great, king of Judaea from 40–4 BCE, stood at multiple political and cultural crossroads. Rising to power as an Idumaean noble within the Hasmonean royal court, he was heavily involved in the violent and bloody transition from Roman Republic to Augustan Principate.

The Hasmonean dynasty (/ ˌ h æ z m ə ˈ n iː ən / (); Hebrew: חַשְׁמוֹנַּאִים, Ḥašmona'īm) was a ruling dynasty of Judea and surrounding regions during classical n c. and c. BCE the dynasty ruled Judea semi-autonomously from the BCE, with the Seleucid Empire disintegrating, the dynasty became fully independent, expanded into Common languages: Biblical Hebrew, Old . The Formation of the Nabatean Capital, in: K. Fittschen and Gideon Foerster (eds.), Judaea and the Greco-Roman World in the Time of Herod in the Light of Archaeological Evidence. Herod, it seems, made a deliberate break from his Jewish kingdom for the electrifying ways of the Greco-Roman world. Herodian Judea faced many changes over its history, but none more drastic in Author: Ehud Netzer. Judaea and the Greco-Roman world in the time of Herod in the light of archaeological evidence: acts of a symposium [] Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, Description.

When Judaea became a vassal state of Rome in 63 B.C., the rulers found a willing collaborator in the form of Herod’s father, Antipater, who was made procurator—financial governor—of the new. You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.   In the book of Acts, Luke mentions a famine that occured during the reign of the Roman emperor Claudius: D uring this time some prophets came down from Jerusalem to Antioch. One of them, named Agabus, stood up and through the Spirit predicted that a severe famine would spread over the entire Roman world. (This happened during the reign of.   See also Reinhard Förtsch, “The Residences of King Herod and Their Relations to Roman Villa Architecture,” in Judaea and the Greco-Roman World in the Light of Archaeological Discoveries (ed. Klaus Fittschen and Gideon Foerster; Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & .

Judaea and the Greco-Roman world in the time of Herod in the light of archaeological evidence Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Judaea and the Greco-Roman world in the time of Herod in the light of archaeological evidence: acts of a symposium. [Klaus Fittschen; G Foerster; Universiṭah ha-ʻIvrit bi-Yerushalayim.

Makhon le-arkheʼologyah.; Universität Göttingen. Archäologisches Institut.;]. Get this from a library. Judaea and the Greco-Roman world in the time of Herod in the light of archaeological evidence acts of a symposium.

[Klaus Fittschen; ha- Makhon le-Arkhe'ologyah;]. he closed his magisterial book on Herod with these words: "The Significance of the Cities in the Kingdom of Herod," in Judaea and the Greco-Roman World in the Time of Herod in the Light of Archaeological Evidence: Acts of Journal of Biblical Literatureno.

4 (). G. Foerster, “Hellenistic and Roman Trends in the Herodian Architecture of Masada,” in Judaea and the Greco-Roman World in the Time of Herod in the Light of Archaeological Evidence (ed.

Fittschen and G. Foerster; Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, ),here Note the Hellenistic tholos in the second platform of the Author: Eyal Regev. Yet to understand the relationship between Herod and his subjects, between ruler and ruled, it is necessary, as part of the general background, to undertake a general analysis of Herodian Judaea and its relationship with the classical world, beginning with Augustan Rome, which was then the center of power, and followed by the main centers.

Judaea and the Greco-Roman World in the Time of Herod in the Light of Archaeological Evidence: Acts of a Symposium: Jerusalem / Article Klaus FittschenAuthor: Achim Lichtenberger. Herod's reign and the Herodian kingdom in general demonstrate the process of Romanization at the time of Augustus.

Herod saw in Augustus an ideal model that he tried to imitate. Herod pushed Judaea toward a Temple (Ant. Another three cases, also discussed by Fuks, are mentioned. The Hasmonean King Alexander Jannaeus, besieged the city of Gaza around BC, on the grounds that the Gazans had favoured the Ptolemies over the Judaeans in their recent battles.

Gaza was occupied and its inhabitants put to the sword by Jannaeus. The Hasmonean King Alexander Jannaeus, besieged the city of Gaza around BC, on the grounds that the Gazans had favoured the Ptolemies over the Judaeans in their recent battles.

Gaza was occupied and its inhabitants put to the sword by languages: Nabataean Aramaic. Judea and the Greco-Roman world in the time of Herod in the light of archaeological evidence. Göttingen: Van Den Hoeck & Ruprecht, Holum, Kenneth G. Caesarea: Herod and beyond: buildings of powe r.

Simply Irresistible: Augustus, Herod, and the Empire. and the Greco-Roman World in the. Time of. Herod in the. an unprecedented amount of archaeological : Ron Mccane. Judea at the time of Jesus' birth was a client kingdom, ruled by Herod the Great under Rome's authority.

He probably had his own troops for security and general military needs, though Rome may have sent him temporary reinforcements when necessary. In the case of the client kingdom, Judea, Herod's rule and Herod's forces would have been the political entity.

But everyone knew that Rome was the power behind the throne. Netzer E., “The Palaces Built by Herod – A Research Update”, Judaea and the Greco-Roman World in the Time of Herod in the Light of Archaeological Evidence, Abhandlungen der Akademie der Wissenschaften in Göttingen, (K.

Fittchen and G. Foerster eds.), Göttingen, Pp. Judaea and the Greco-Roman World in the Time of Herod in the Light of Archaeological Evidence Acts ol' a Symposium Organized by the Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Archaeological Institute, Georg-August-tJniversity of Göttingcn at Jerusalem November 3rd —4th Edited by Klaus Fittschen and Gideon Foerster.

Third, we know that the reign over Samaria and Judea of Herod’s son and successor Archelaus began in 4 B.C., based on the fact that he was deposed by Caesar in A.U.C.

(Anno Urbis Conditae [in the year the city was founded])or A.D. 6, in the tenth year of his reign (Dio Cassius, Roman History ; Josephus, Antiquities ).Counting backward his reign began in 4 B.C. “The Economic Importance of Herod’s Masada: The Evidence of the Jar Inscriptions.” In Judaea and the Greco-Roman World in the Time of Herod in Light of Archaeological Evidence, ed.

Klaus Fittschen and Gideon Foerster, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, Cotton, Hannah M. and Joseph Geiger. “Herod and Masada: The Written. Between 41 and 44 CE, Judea regained its nominal autonomy, when Herod Agrippa was made King of the Jews by the emperor Claudius, thus in a sense restoring the Herodian dynasty, although there is no indication that Judea ceased to be a Roman province simply because it no longer had a l: Caesarea Maritima.

Judaea and the Greco-Roman world in the time of Herod in the light of archaeological evidence: acts of a symposium: Kaisersaal Porträts aus d.

Kapitolin. Museen in Rom ; Köln, Röm.-German. Museum, April - Juni Katalog der antiken Skulpturen in Schloss Erbach. They were influenced by the trade, culture, and political structures of the larger Greco-Roman world, though scholars debate to what extent.

Two cities in Galilee, Sepphoris and Tiberias, played a role in spreading Greco-Roman influence in Galilee. Herod Antipas, the Roman client-king of Galilee during Jesus’ time, established them. Negotiating Jewish identity in the Greco-Roman world was not easy.

In BCE a popular rebellion broke out in Judea, led by a relatively obscure rural family of priests known as the Hasmonians. "The Palaces Built by Herod – A Research Update", Judaea and the Greco-Roman World in the Time of Herod in the Light of Archaeological Evidence, Abhandlungen der Akademie der Wissenschaften in Göttingen, (K.

Fittchen and G. Herod Antipater (Greek: Ἡρῴδης Ἀντίπατρος, Hērǭdēs Antipatros; born before 20 BC – died after 39 AD), known by the nickname Antipas, was a 1st-century ruler of Galilee and Perea, who bore the title of tetrarch ("ruler of a quarter") and is referred to as both "Herod the Tetrarch" and "King Herod" in the New Testament, although he never held the title of : Herod the Great.

Ephesus in ancient times was known for its sorcery and occultic practices, so much so that the phrase Ephesia grammata or "Ephesian scripts or writings" became a common term in the Greco-Roman world for magical texts (Bruce, CBA, p. ; Unger, ANT, p). Some fairly early magical papyrus texts of this type are still extant today (see.

Herod's last will was validated by Augustus, leaving Herod Antipas over Galilee and territory to the north (4 B.C.-A.D. 39), Herod Philip over northern Transjordan (4 B.C.-A.D. 34), and Archelaus over Judea (4 B.C.-A.D.

The Romans, judging the rule of Archelaus to be inadequate, removed him in favor of a string of Roman governors over Judea. In Judaea and the Greco-Roman World in the Time of Herod in Light of Archaeological Evidence, eds.

Fittschen and G. Foerster. Göttingen: Vandenhoech and Ruprecht, Cotton, H.M. and J.C. Greenfield. Families in the Greco-Roman world of the first century were generally greek culture and thought in the Mediterranean world from the time of Alexander the Great (mid 's B.C.) the national center of worship and Jewish identity in Jerusalem during Jesus's time.

It was renovated and expanded by Herod the Great prior to birth of Christ. Herod Archelaus, (born 22 bc, Judaea—died c. ad 18, Gaul), son and principal heir of Herod I the Great as king of Judaea, deposed by Rome because of his unpopularity with the Jews.

Named in his father’s will as ruler of the largest part of the Judaean kingdom—Judaea proper, Idumaea, and Samaria—Archelaus went to Rome (4 bc) to defend his title against the claims of his brothers Philip.

Judaea and the Greco-Roman World In the Time of Herod In the Light of Archaeological Evidence: Acts of a Symposium. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, Kropp, Andreas J. "Nabatean Petra: the royal palace and the Herod connection." Boreas 32 (): Negev, Avraham. Nabatean Archaeology Today. New York: New York University Press.

Herod Antipas, son of Herod the Great, ruled from 4 BCE to 39 CE over the Jewish provinces of Galilee and Parea. His official title was “tetrarch” (meaning “ruler of a fourth” of his father’s kingdom).

By most standards, he was just an ordinary, local, Jewish ruler, but two incidents during his reign secured him a high place in the history books.

Rome was not the undisputed master of the Near East. The empire of Parthia stretched from modern Afghanistan through Iran to the Euphrates River in Iraq, encompassing territories once ruled by Persian kings and then by Alexander the Great and his successors.

Existing for nearly years (c. B.C.E. to the s C.E.), the Parthian state was the only advanced civilization that bordered the. E. Netzer, “The Palaces Built by Herod—A Research Update,” in Judaea and the Greco-Roman World in the Time of Herod in the Light of Archaeological Evidence: Acts of a Symposium Organised by the Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Archaeological Institute, Georg-August-University of Göttingen at Jerusalem.Evidence from Archaeology.

Luke -- archaeological support -- the Roman Census under Quirinius (Cyrenius) McDowell states that, "It was one time conceded that Luke had entirely missed the boat in the events he portrayed as surrounding the birth of Jesus (Luke ).